Category Archives: Exhibitions

Arts Opportunity: 2015 North Charleston Arts Festival Deadline is Dec. 5

???????????????Artist Applications are now being accepted from local, regional & national artists, ethnic & cultural groups, community based groups, and individuals who wish to be considered for participation in the 2015 North Charleston Arts Festival, set for May 1-9. This annual nine-day celebration of the arts provides over 30,000 residents and visitors with an array of free and moderately priced performances, exhibitions and activities that take place throughout North Charleston and the surrounding area.

Artists may apply to participate in the Arts Festival’s Main Event (May 2 & 3) and/or submit a proposal for a stand-alone Individual Event in the following disciplines: Dance, Music, Theatre, Visual Arts, Crafts, Photography, Media Arts and Literature. Applicants who wish to apply for both the Main Event and an Individual Event must submit a separate application for each category. The review panel will consider applications with requests ranging from paid compensation to non-paid free event proposals.   Various forms of assistance will be provided based on the requests in the applicant’s proposal.

Visual Artists/Fine Craft Artisans/Photographers should note that the Artist Application is for events and presentations such as installations, solo/group exhibitions, workshops, demos, lectures, etc., and NOT for participation in the Festival’s judged art competitions. Competition applications will be posted in March 2015.

In addition to the Artist Application, local youth performing artists may also consider submitting an Opening Processional Application. The Opening Processional has kicked off the Arts Festival’s Main Event festivities for over ten years and features groups dressed in brightly colored outfits and costumes, volunteers carrying giant puppets, banners and other crafted props, jugglers, dance troupes, and school groups. Participants parade around the Convention Center Complex into the North Charleston Performing Arts Center Auditorium where the celebration continues with a Community Groups Performance Spotlight, featuring performances by pre-selected groups.

There is no fee to apply!
The deadline for submission of Artist and Opening Processional applications is 5:00pm on Friday, December 5, 2014.

NOTE: The deadline is now one month earlier than in previous years!
Applications must be mailed or hand-delivered.
Those submitted by fax or email will not be accepted.

The 2015 North Charleston Arts Festival Artist Application may be obtained by clicking on this link. All applications for the Arts Festival, including the Artist and Opening Processional applications, can be downloaded from the “Apply” page at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com.

Visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com to view details on other participation opportunities, the 2014 festival components, and updates on the 2015 festival schedule. Questions may be directed to the Cultural Arts Dept. at 843-740-5854 or culturalarts@northcharleston. org.

 

Lulie Wallace: The Sweet Life

Spiky Flowers, by Lulie Wallace

Spiky Flowers, by Lulie Wallace

Lulie Wallace is scrolling through designs she’s fashioned into patterns on her laptop: “There’s a million of them, there’s tons,” she says, smiling.

“I’ve licensed things before to places like Anthropologie and Urban Outfitters- but what I’ve really been wanting to see is whole patterns [based on her work]- and it turns out there’s this whole field called surface design.  It turns out a lot of illustrators are in surface design.  And a lot of artists.”

We’re sitting in Redux’s classroom at two wooden tables tucked together just shy of the center of the room.  Big boxes of Wallace’s goods are stacked to one side, ready to ship out.  The AC blows down to one side of us warmishly, and if we turn to one side we can see into Wallace’s studio.

The burlap doors are still pinned back from her recent show, and from here I can see walls filled from floor to ceiling with cheerful canvases: flowers in patterned pots and pitchers, cheerful tablescapes.  One shows a table strewn with flower cuttings and a pair of scissors.  Wallace’s work is whimsical and folksy, with a largely pastel palette; each one beachy and full of sunshine like Wallace herself, who is wriggling in her chair beside me, happily vibrating in flip flops and cut offs as she scrolls.

“I love seeing art come off the canvas.  I mean, you look at a blouse, you look at a bedspread- they’re forms of everyday art, art you can actually use.  So my idea is to approach people who are already working with fabric and have them use my patterns.  There are five collaborators I’d really like to work with- I call them my dreamweavers.” She smiles when I ask who her dreamweavers are.  “Let’s call them a local clothing company, a kids clothing line, maybe a badass stationary line.”  A friend of hers comes into the classroom wielding a box of cupcakes;  Lulie dives in delightedly.  “Fabric is so nice because it doesn’t take a lot of money to see the art form to fruition.  And I can do fabric to order.  I can do it by the yard.”

Pink Flowers, by Lulie Wallace

Pink Flowers, by Lulie Wallace

 

So how does this work, turning one of her canvases into a pattern?

“I sketch with a very fine illustrator pen and then I scan into an ordinary printer.  I use Adobe Illustrator and photoshop.  I applied to get a UGA fabric design student to come in and intern here this summer, and she’s teaching me all the technical stuff I wouldn’t have known.  She’s super proficient in photoshop.”

Machinery whines from a studio on the other side of the gallery.

“It’s like a giant carpenter bee,” I say- and then wince as the whine gives way to hammering.

Wallace laughs.  “That’s Kaminer.  [A jewelry designer.]  We call her Haminer.”  Something on her screen suddenly catches her eye, and Lulie Wallace leans into her computer, concentrating.

I excuse myself for a few minutes to explore her studio, leaving Wallace to work. Behind the burlap doors I find a large wheelie cart piled high with brushes, paints, used palettes.  A pair of old-fashioned sunglasses perch owlishly above a small carton of maple almond butter in squeezie packs.  An emergency stash?  More palettes, paints, brushes.

Underneath all this is the aforementioned printer; ordinary, as Wallace said, and on the other side of the cart is a jumble of shoes, some tupperware, and a beach towel.  The walls are covered with canvases, and a tall metal chair sits in one corner, splattered with paint.  It is facing her newest piece, featuring a brightly colored table setting. When I come back out into the classroom, Wallace is scrolling again.

“Its so fun to scan your stuff in,” she says.  “There’s so many color manipulation possibilities.  Things you could never do ordinarily with a canvas- you can change the color palette in an instant, completely changing the personality of a pattern.  Same design, but with a different color.  We call that ‘color-ways.’”

“Beautiful word.”

“It is.” Wallace looks up as her intern, Brooke Davidson, sails into the studio.  Davidson’s sunny blonde hair is tied up and smoothed back by a wide black headband.

Davidson explains she primarily works in photoshop.  “You try to create a repeat where you don’t notice the tile.  When I look at fabric I can see if its’ got a good repeat or not.”

“Can you look at fabric and pick out the tile?”

“Kind of, sometimes.  There’s also this thing you can do called a half drop repeat, where the pattern kind of continues down, and so the next one fits into it a little lower.”

I ask her how she likes her internship.

“It’s been really fun, I love Charleston so much!  I wish I could stay, but I have to go back and student teach.  But maybe someday!”

We talk about the possibility of her getting a studio here, and of further collaborations with Lulie. She’s been working with Wallace to help her develop “a portfolio of a ton of repeats.  And I’ve been painting a lot this summer, I’m been so inspired by,” she sweeps her hands around us,  “all this!  I’m doing abstract stuff, playing with layers.  It’s cellular, almost.  And Lulie gives me so much good advice.  She said next week maybe I could even bring my stuff in, we can play around with it in photoshop.  Have you seen the lunchboxes she does?”

Davidson takes me around to the side of Lulie Wallace’s studio; more canvases, more boxes of product.  She pulls out an old fashioned metal lunch box coated in one of Wallace’s cheery design.

“How fun!”

“Yeah, she’s great,” Brooke says, grinning.

But cupcake break is over, and now Wallace and Davidson seem itchy to get back to work.  We hug goodbye, and I leave them still happily chattering and scrolling away under the air conditioner.

-article by Pauline West, a novelist and writer for Redux Contemporary Art Center.  Her novel Evening’s Land recently won the Helene Wurlitzer Fellowship Award.

Peaches and Cream, by Lulie Wallace

Peaches and Cream, by Lulie Wallace

July 18th- Palette and Palate Stroll!

Get your tickets while you can by clicking HERE!

A delightful evening that charms all the senses, this event is one for the memory books.  Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the historic streets of Charleston, visiting some of her finest galleries while savoring bites and sips from eight of her most prestigious restaurants.

Here’s a list of 2014’s Pairings…

Anglin Smith Fine Art (Formally Smith Killian) – Circa 1886
Corrigan Gallery – Barsa
Dog & Horse Fine Art – Zero Café and Bar
Ella W. Richardson Fine Art –  Langdon’s
Helena Fox Fine Art – Cypress
Martin Gallery – Oak Steakhouse
Robert Lange Studios –  McCrady’s
The Sylvan Gallery – Halls Chophouse

Reservations highly recommended; these tickets have wings.

July 18th Palate and Palette Stroll

July 18th Palate and Palette Stroll

Hollis Hammonds: Worthless Matter

hammonds

Things Hollis Hammonds is Obsessed with:

1. Japanese Manga

2. Post Apocalyptic Narratives

3. Superhero Movies

4. Really Bad Action/Armageddon Films.

“I love seeing the explosions,” she says, leaning over the bar counter, peering around and smiling at me.  Professor and chair of visual studies at St Edwards University in Austin, Texas: but with her black pageboy, smoke-colored glasses and clear gaze, Hollis Hammonds could be a character in one of her manga adventures.

A mad professor, an evil genius, doing what she can to reimagine the materialistic world.

In real life, Hammonds has 11 full-time faculty members, and “I don’t even know how many part-time members.”  Although she teaches three classes a day and for a time also ran a gallery, she shows constantly.  She’s had 10 solo shows all around the country just in the past two years.  “I tend to be more productive in shorter blocks.”

We’re at Closed for Business on a steamy Sunday- on Mother’s Day, in fact, although as I write this, I realize I neglected to ask her if she has any children. (She doesn’t, although she does have a dog.)

“Can I get something really light and crisp?” she says.  “I tend to like Chinese or Japanese beer.”  The bartender amiably sets her up with a tulip of Hitachino. I order a Chocolate Rye Porter.

“I have a couple manifestations of the work,” she says.  “Primarily, though, I draw.  These piles, islands of objects.”

Aftermath: Asteroid

Aftermath: Asteroid

It started in April of 2011, when more than 200 tornadoes broke over the United States in a four day period.  Watching coverage, Hammonds became interested in how “we, as viewers, are interested in the aftermath of both man-made and natural disasters.”

Also drawing on the aftermath of the house fire she experienced herself as a teenager, she began making charcoal sketches on white paper: “Dystopian, futuristic, kind of dark but seductive.”

“Destruction is seductive,” I say.  “We’re drawn to what destroys us.”  Chocolate rye, you’ll be the death of me.

“Yes.”

In Ruins

In Ruins

So her work started as “documentation, homage. Of course, now I’ve turned it into this indulgent fascination with materialistic consumption.  My father was born in the 1920s, my mother in the 1930s.  So they hoarded everything.  I mean, we had an entire room dedicated to plastic containers.  They could not throw anything away.”

I’ve seen Hoarders.  I asked if animal carcasses were ever found amidst the containers.

“That’s the defining line, isn’t it?” Hammonds said.  “No, it never got that far.  Before the house burned, though, my mother had a lot of collections.  She had her mother’s things, her grandmother’s things.  Old furniture, things like that.  But it was after the fire that her desire to collect these things really intensified.  She began to collect dolls, Lilliput houses.  Trying to hang on to something, I guess.”

“You think collections are a way for people to try to comfort themselves?”

“Oh, sure.”

While Hammonds doesn’t have any collections herself, her husband, a graphic designer, does have “a collection of graphic design toys on this floating shelf.”  She laughs.  “He takes them down, rearranges them, everything.  It’s so funny.”

She likes to do work that is endemic to place, and so she always sources her materials from the cities where she makes her installation.  “I got this new studio two years ago, and I did start thinking it’d be great to have a space to collect things for installations.”  She shook her head, smiling ruefully. “But we have this policy- it’s from Pinterest– anything comes in, something has to go out.  We keep everything minimal and clean.  Even artwork has to be approved.”  She laughs again.  “By my husband.”

What do her parents think of her art?   “Maybe they’d feel a little… mocked, I don’t know.”  But her parents are both deceased.  They were each married and divorced prior to having Hammonds, and she has 11 half brothers and sisters, all ranging from 30 to 11 years older than her.  She shrugs when I ask her what they think of her work.

“A lot of them really don’t know what’s going on in my life.  One sister is a quilt artist.  Recently she says to me, “couldn’t there be some leaves?”  She sips her beer.  “You know, I look at people like Anselm Kiefer.  His work is very dark and also amazing.  I don’t think my work is as dark as his, really, but it also ride that line of beauty and terror. My installations, because they are in physical space- the viewer experiences them with a sense of wonder.  They’re visceral.”

I was curious if the house fire she experienced as a girl changed her immediately- or did its impact take a while to surface?

“Going through the process of losing everything as a teenager certainly informed my personality.  I learned to not have emotional attachment to objects.  I treat objects as a metaphor for the human condition but also self-worth.  I’m interested in how collections can validate us societally, personally.  And I’ve lost a lot of people, so I’ve also gone through the process of sorting through these… artifacts.   I have this shoebox. With my father’s license, my mother’s birth certificate, trinkets like that.  And I also have this box of old photographs.  I’ll keep those until they’re lost.”

“It would be awful to throw away photographs.  I always feel horrible when I see those boxes of old photographs for sale in antique stores.  But I wonder if maybe that’s what it takes to move on as a society, philosophically- the destruction/abandonment of objects.  Do you think objects might hold us back from progress?”

She shrugged.  “Our search for power is consuming the world.”  We were quiet a moment, looking around at the happy clutter of the bar.  “I used to be a figurative artist,” she mused.  “I was obsessed with it.  But I’ve got to this stage in my work when I’m more fascinated with storytelling. I took the figure out completely.  I use the things that are left behind to signify the figures.  Chairs, you know.  People’s things.”

“Keeping just the echo of the figure.”

“Yes.  I had that passionate obsession with drawing figures,” she says, to the counter.  “Not to say that it won’t come back, but I don’t have that anymore.”

We finish our beers and walk back to Redux.  It’s locked up, according to a hand-drawn sign, “for all the Mothers in the world. Happy Mother’s Day!”  Hammonds unlocks it, flips on the lights.  The interior is blissfully cool and quiet.  I hug her tightly and then leave her standing there, in an arena of people’s cast off things.

Come see what she’s made of them at the opening of Worthless Matter on May 16th.  Artist talk at 5:30 pm.

endemic sourcing

endemic sourcing

Planning the installation

Planning the installation

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-article by Pauline West, a novelist and writer for Redux Contemporary Art Center.  She is at work on her first Southern Gothic.

We Need Your Stuff!

Have you ever had your ephemera or discarded home goods immortalized in art?

Well, here is your chance.

Hollis Hammonds will be constructing a site-specific installation for her upcoming exhibition Worthless Matter at Redux (on view May 16 – June 28, proud part of Piccolo Spoleto). She needs your stuff!

wm-install4-sm

up close installation shot–we need more like this!

In the spirit of re-use and recycling, Austin artist Hollis Hammonds seeks physical donations of objects, furniture, and debris for her upcoming installation: Worthless Matter at Redux. We are looking for old and broken furniture, personal objects, wood scraps, baskets, toys, bikes, and so on.

Please drop off your goodies at:

Redux, 136 St. Philip Street
May 5th – 9th
between 10 am – 6 pm

Call us at 843.722.0697 if you need us to pick up!

Thank you!

Opportunity Alert

Charleston-based artists!

Here are a couple of opportunities you don’t want to miss out on.

Annual Piccolo Spoleto Juried Exhibition – Call For Entries
Deadline: April 21
The City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with Redux Contemporary Art Center, is posting an open Call for Entries for the Annual Piccolo Spoleto Juried Exhibition, which will take place at City Gallery at Waterfront Park, 34 Prioleau Street, from May 23 – June 8, 2014.

There will be cash prizes for Best in Show ($500) and in each category: Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Drawing, and Sculpture ($100 each). Applicants must be SC residents for the last 12 months. read more

Enough Pie Community Project Grant
Deadline: April 23
Enough Pie is currently accepting Letters of Intent (a one-page explanation of your idea and how funds would be used) for their Spring granting cycle. Recipients are eligible to receive up to $1,000 if selected. Arts and culture should be at the core of the project, and it needs to be aimed at the upper peninsula of Charleston. read more

CPG

Mariah Channing, Cameo Queen

Untitled, by Mariah Channing

Untitled, by Mariah Channing

Our own Mariah Channing won Best in Photography at the Halsey’s Salon de Refuses!  If you’re interested in a print, she can be reached at mariahchanning@gmail.com.

Come and see the show!  It’s up until May 3rd, 2014, and makes for a delightful walkabout!